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Posts Tagged ‘big tent christianity’

The other day I got an email from Steve Knight asking me to participate in a Synchroblog for the Big Tent Christianity Conference happening in Raleigh, North Carolina this week. I’m hoping to join other Christian bloggers, including Beloved, in setting out a vision for what the church will look like in the future.

Here’s the theme prompts we were given:

1)    What do you think?
2)    What are your hopes and dreams for the Church?
3)    More specifically, what does “big tent Christianity” mean to you? And what does it look like in your context?

Here’s my answer to question #1. Here’s my answer to question #2. Here’s my answer to question #3.

3) I’m pretty excited about this question, mainly because of some conversations I’ve been in over the last 2-3 years and some more specific meetings I’ve been in in the last 2-3 months. Here in Bend, OR, where I serve, we are trying some stuff. Stuff that I think might be some seed planting for the future of not only the PC(USA) denomination but other mainline churches as well. (specifically ELCA and The Episcopal Church)

In Bend, a Nativity Lutheran (ELCA), First Presbyterian Church (PC(USA)) and Trinity Episcopal Church (Episcopal Church) have partnered to open a locally sourced cafe that “endeavors to serve extraordinary food to all people.” Common Table is growing into an example of what a partnership for the betterment of the community and world could look like.

Because of the conversations that were happening around Common Table already the three youth leaders of the three churches (who were already friends) began dreaming about what it would look like to bring our middle and high school groups together. While these conversations are ongoing our plan is to begin having our youth meet together weekly as well as join together for local, regional and international service opportunities.

Here’s the letter that was sent out this week:

In a sermon to the participants of Presbyterian Youth Triennium the Rev. Dr. Tony Campolo said, “When Christianity stopped being radical it stopped being Christianity.”This fall youth in Bend will take a radical step out in faith. Members of Nativity Lutheran, First Presbyterian and Trinity Episcopal will follow the call from God to combine our gifts and skills to be Christ’s hands and feet in the world. We seek to serve our community with energy, passion, thought and a whole lot of fun – together.

3 churches                  Þ                  1 community

3 traditions                 Þ                  1 faith

3 histories                   Þ                  1 future

The team leading this effort consists of Ron Werner, Director of Youth Ministries at Nativity Lutheran, Rev. Greg Bolt, Associate Pastor of Youth and Family Ministry at First Presbyterian Church and Donna Jacobsen, Youth and Family Ministries Leader at Trinity Episcopal Church.

What does this mean… really?

What it means is that our Middle School and High School groups will meet together, sharing our histories, sharing our traditions and sharing our church grounds and, in so doing, live out the mission we all share – acting as a reflection of God’s love to our community and the wider world. We’ll also meet in the wider world. For instance, we intend to have the High School group call Common Table, the locally sourced café opening up at 150 Oregon Avenue, their home base.

There will be a weekly Middle School youth group gathering and a weekly High School youth group gathering. We are planning an international mission trip and an “urban immersion” trip closer to home. We are brainstorming ways to coordinate confirmation class sessions and a retreat. In short, we are breaking down any perceived walls and giving our youth the gift of peer support regardless of individual church affiliation. We are combining the skills and experience of three gifted leaders and three wonderful church families in support of each youth’s spiritual formation.

How cool is that?

We do realize that this is unusual. And, much as that may energize the three of us, it may make others uncomfortable. We welcome the opportunity to talk with anyone who has questions of us or ideas for us. We can come together in small groups or talk with you individually, just please make sure your concerns or support are known!

Blessings,

So, that’s basically it. “Big Tent Christianity” looks like three mainline, progressive churches partnering together to try to feed, grow and advocate for a better community in hopes that in some small way we do our part to bring about the kingdom on earth as it is in Heaven.

Blessings,

Buttface

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The other day I got an email from Steve Knight asking me to participate in a Synchroblog for the Big Tent Christianity Conference happening in Raleigh, North Carolina this week. I’m hoping to join other Christian bloggers, including Beloved, in setting out a vision for what the church will look like in the future.

Here’s the theme prompts we were given:

1)    What do you think?
2)    What are your hopes and dreams for the Church?
3)    More specifically, what does “big tent Christianity” mean to you? And what does it look like in your context?

In my last post I answered question #1. Here’s my answer to question #2

2) My hopes and dreams for the church are simple, but not necessarily easy. I would simply hope that we begin to trust one another more. Trust one another to discern who God has called to ministry, trust one another to honor the sanctity of marriage between TWO people, trust one another that they have come to their beliefs faithfully after careful study and trust one another that we are ALL children of God and should be treated with respect.

When I was in seminary I thought myself fairly open minded until my CPE (clinical pastoral education) supervisor called me a liberal fundamentalist. I earned this moniker by not being open to some my more conservative classmate’s views on theology. Later that fall, my right leaning next door neighbor stormed into my room and said, “You liberals, will let you be anything you want except conservative!”

I felt like God was talking to me in those interchanges. God was telling me, “if you are going to be open and inclusive, you BETTER be open to EVERYONE.” That doesn’t mean that I don’t think that some of my colleagues in ministry are off their rocker, but it does mean that I have an obligation to them to hear them out respecting their journey. It is not my job to change their minds, that’s God’s work. Maybe an interaction filled with respect and grace will open them up or open me up to a new view. I’m sure a heated debate will do nothing but further the divide between us.

That’s my hope for the church. That we as the body of Christ can learn to speak to each other with grace and respect allowing our unity in Christ to allow us to trust God’s work through our diversity.

Blessings,

Buttface

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What does “big tent Christianity” mean to you? And what does it look like in your context?

I am hopeful about the big tent Christianity movement.  In my small town, the local pastor’s association has worked hard on creating a space where every person is respected and encouraged.  I am almost always the only mainliner there.  I am most definitely the only woman there.  But I make it a point to go every month, specifically because I am different and I am challenged by the Christianity that is sometimes promoted at this gathering.  I know I make others uncomfortable just by being a young woman (shouldn’t I be at home with my daughter?).  But everybody makes a point to make me feel welcome.

For the most part, the unity of the pastor’s association has just been talk.  But we are beginning to try and put hands and feet on working together, showing unity, being a strong force for good in our community in the name of Jesus Christ through joint service projects, joint worship services, etc.   There are people at these meetings that I know I fundamentally disagree with on many issues.  But in the end, we all worship the same God, we all profess faith in Jesus, we all are trying to live out our faith.  And so I am hopeful that we can be a face of the church in our community that is positive and appreciated.  May it be so.

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The other day I got an email from Steve Knight asking me to participate in a Synchroblog for the Big Tent Christianity Conference happening in Raleigh, North Carolina this week. I’m hoping to join other Christian bloggers, including Beloved, in setting out a vision for what the church will look like in the future.

Here’s the theme prompts we were given:

1)    What do you think?
2)    What are your hopes and dreams for the Church?
3)    More specifically, what does “big tent Christianity” mean to you? And what does it look like in your        context?

1) When I hear the term “big tent Christianity” I think about mainline churches beginning to work together to provide service and mission to their communities and the world. I realize this may be a little limiting, however in my experience I have heard many people, mostly evangelicals (I would list myself as an evangelical, not in the current vernacular but in the ACTUAL definition of the word) say “I just want to go to church, I don’t want baptist or presbyterian or lutheran. I just want to go to church…one big church.”

This I feel like is a great goal, but not one that is attainable not really that effective or life giving.

This summer I was working at a PC(USA) camp for middle schoolers and one of the other youth leaders who wasn’t currently serving a PC(USA) congregation and I were talking. I was asking him about his congregation including it’s denominational affiliation, if any. His response was, “honestly I couldn’t  tell you the difference between baptist or presbyterian or whatever. I don’t think it matters.” I was shocked.
This is were I tell you that I am a self proclaimed PresbyNerd. I ABSOLUTELY think it matters!

I think the differences, theological and otherwise, that have brought us to this point in our journey are vital. They help define who we are and where we’ve come from, if we lose that I believe we lose our history. As Lord Acton said, “Those who don’t know their history are doomed to repeat it.”
I think that our differences are important, but our commonalities are what can bring us under a “big tent”. Our common call from Christ to love the Lord God with all your heart, soul, mind and strength and to love your neighbor as yourself should be the fertilizer that brings forth fruit from our deep roots of faith.
I was planning on covering all three questions in this post, but I don’t want to bore you. In my next post I’ll cover question #2 What are your hopes and dreams for the Church?
Blessings,
Buttface

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