Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Reviews’ Category

In his book Rewilding the Way – Break Free to Follow an Untamed God, Todd Wynward asks many questions about the state of Western Christianity and the state of our planet.  One of the most intriguing for me was: How can Christians who have a spouse and children that they want to care for and support also radically follow the call from God through Jesus in the times in which we live? This is a question that I often ponder as a Christian who loves God deeply and who also loves my spouse and children deeply.

The book offers biblical background, historical examples and modern day prophets that point to these questions.  I think I was hoping for a more prescriptive approach vs. a descriptive vision because I tend to like lists and steps vs. dreams and stories but that is a difference of style than a critique of the content.  My only wish is that the examples had been a little more broad.  If I’m unable to move to New Mexico or the East or West Coast and not interested in becoming a Mennonite, the stories that relate to my circumstances become thin.

Overall, the book offered me glimpses of what the way forward could be, introduced me to people and movements I knew little about and provided another perspective on what Christianity in the future could look like.

 

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the author and/or publisher through the Speakeasy blogging book review network.  I was not required to write a positive review.  The opinions I have expressed are my own.  I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR,Part 255.

Read Full Post »

When my copy of Steeped arrived in the mail, I sat and turned through the pages, salivating at all the delicious foods pictured there.  The pictures and layouts had me dreaming of hosting tea parties and warm summer soirees.

 

Life happened and I only ended up having time to make three of the recipes in the book.  They were each from a different section of the book and each called for a different kind of tea.  I live in a small, rural town so I decided to make recipes with ingredients I knew I could find here.  I ended up choosing Mint Pea Soup, Smoky Tomato Soup with Parmesan Thyme Crisps, and Blueberry Scones with Rooibos Honey Butter.

 

Overall, the recipes were easy to follow.  I really liked the creamy tomato soup and the crisps added crunch and flavor that paired wonderfully with the soup.  The blueberry scones were easy to make and the honey butter made them extra decadent.  The mint pea soup ended up tasting mostly just of blended peas and wasn’t a favorite at my house.

 

While each of the recipes called for a different tea, none of the teas ended up being a dominant flavor in the end.  I kept searching for their flavor in each of the dishes but never found I could distinguish them.  I was hoping for more distinct tea flavors in the dishes.

 

I am looking forward to trying more and more of the dishes in Steeped.  Maybe one day I’ll actually get to host a tea party and serve one of the whole menus found in the book.  Until then, I have a beautiful book full of gorgeous food pictures and great recipes to add to my recipe book collection.

You can learn more about the book here: http://anneliesz.com/steeped-book/

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the author and/or publisher through the Speakeasy blogging book review network. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR,Part 255.

Read Full Post »

Ever wonder what the fate of your beloved denomination will be in 20 or 30 years? Have you bemoaned the loss of loyalty to a particular church or to church at all?

You are not alone and this book will be a wonderful resource for you if you are looking to have conversations about how churches within mainline denominations can move forward and even thrive in uncertain times.

The writing style is accessible with lots of humor thrown in and the chapters are a good length if you wanted to do a weekly study with this book. Any member of the church could pick up this book and understand what the author is talking about. He addresses being inclusive, missional and technologically savvy and ways the church can embrace our history to help our future. He also explores some interesting correlations between our current cultural context and the church during post Revolutionary War times and how we might learn from our forebears.

I enjoyed this book but wanted more on a few occasions. It felt to me like the author avoided talking about how the relationship between the institutional church and local congregations is changing and will change. I wanted to hear more about how mainline congregations could work closer together to make an impact. And as a Presbyterian, I took issue with his characterization of some of our theology and polity as it relates to the formation of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). But overall, this book is a great addition to the library of books addressing the future of mainline churches.

You can find our more about the book here: derekpenwell.net

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the author and/or publisher through the Speakeasy blogging book review network. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

Read Full Post »